Artists

Soloist

19 - 20 Feb '20

Tour V
19 - 20 Feb '20

Khatia Buniatishvili

Tour

Concert dates and locations

  • 19 February 2020 | L’Heure bleue La Chaux-de-Fonds | 19:30
  • 20 February 2020 | Victoria Hall Geneva | 20:00

Artists

Programme La Chaux-de-Fonds

With a father who played the trumpet and a mother who sang on stage, Rossini seemed to be predestined for a musical career! He indeed composed his first opera (Demetrio e Polibio) at the age of fourteen, just after entering the Liceo Musicale in Bologna. Four years later, the young composer made his opera debut in Venice with La Cambiale di Matrimonio. The Italian Girl in Algiers was also premiered in Venice, at the San Benedetto Theatre, in 1813. Rossini's first attempt at writing an opera buffa (based on a libretto by Angelo Anelli) turned out as a kind of musical commedia dell'arte, that Stendhal described as "an incredible and organised folly". The composer resolutely turned his back on the long-standing Italian opera practises and let his musical imagination and his theatrical creativity run free in this two-act comedy. The overture is delicately introduced by a murmur of pizzicatos which precede an orchestral whirlwind. This overture is one of the most sparkling orchestral works ever written by Rossini.
Beethoven composed most of his Third Piano Concerto during the year 1800, in the wake of the first two symphonies, the first series of string quartets (op. 18) and some of his major piano sonatas, thus providing further proof of his genius. The composer then touched up the piece several times before its premiere on 5th April 1803 at the Theater an der Wien. The evening’s opulent concert programme also included Beethoven's first two symphonies as well as his oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives. The composer himself played the piano part in the C minor Concerto and was much amused by his page-turner's confusion. Ignaz von Seyfried was mostly confronted with blank pages, except for a few scribbles that served as reference points for the performer. As usual, Beethoven hadn't taken the trouble to write out all of his part, which he played by heart. It is a fact that on the very morning of the concert, it was still jotting down a trombone part for the oratorio! Compared to Beethoven's first two piano concertos, the C minor Concerto shows clear evidence of progress in the instrumental balance, the soloist and the orchestra now being considered as equal partners. The virtuoso solo part is no longer solely indebted to the composer's ability to improvise but fully contributes to the work's dramatic and formal cohesion. The concerto's original manuscript was considered to be lost after the Second World War, but the valuable document resurfaced in Poland in 1977.
Shortly before celebrating his twentieth birthday, Schubert went through a depressive phase owing to the lack of opportunities he seemed to be then facing. Is this the reason that inspired him to call (at a later date) his Fourth Symphony the "Tragic Symphony"? The C minor key, which Schubert had never before used for an orchestra piece, is that of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 and the Coriolan Overture, which Schubert knew since 1809. An association with the idea of "destiny" and "heroic confrontation" led Schubert to choose the title of his symphony, which is in fact by no means tragic. The instrumentation, however, differs from Schubert's earlier symphonies: in his C minor Symphony, the composer has used four, rather than two horns, thus giving more weight to the orchestration that appears broader and more intensive than in past works. Schubert's 4th Symphony seems to justify its title in the first bars of the introduction by adopting a solemn and dark tone, but the initial tension soon vanishes in the Allegro vivace that follows. The Andante creates a typically intimate and lyrical Schubertian atmosphere that already foreshadows the great Schubert symphonies to come. The composer once again designated the robust scherzo that follows as a "Minuet". The final movement briefly returns to the dramatic opening mood before leading the piece to a flamboyant finish. This symphony might have been performed during Schubert's lifetime by a gathering of amateur musicians, but its public premiere did not take place until 1849.

Programme Geneva

Overture As a prelude to each concert, talented Swiss singers and instrumentalists will have the opportunity to introduce themselves to the public. This is a twofold "overture", which not only serves as an introduction to the concerts but also as a career gateway for our "our stars of tomorrow”.


Ouverture

With a father who played the trumpet and a mother who sang on stage, Rossini seemed to be predestined for a musical career! He indeed composed his first opera (Demetrio e Polibio) at the age of fourteen, just after entering the Liceo Musicale in Bologna. Four years later, the young composer made his opera debut in Venice with La Cambiale di Matrimonio. The Italian Girl in Algiers was also premiered in Venice, at the San Benedetto Theatre, in 1813. Rossini's first attempt at writing an opera buffa (based on a libretto by Angelo Anelli) turned out as a kind of musical commedia dell'arte, that Stendhal described as "an incredible and organised folly". The composer resolutely turned his back on the long-standing Italian opera practises and let his musical imagination and his theatrical creativity run free in this two-act comedy. The overture is delicately introduced by a murmur of pizzicatos which precede an orchestral whirlwind. This overture is one of the most sparkling orchestral works ever written by Rossini.
Beethoven composed most of his Third Piano Concerto during the year 1800, in the wake of the first two symphonies, the first series of string quartets (op. 18) and some of his major piano sonatas, thus providing further proof of his genius. The composer then touched up the piece several times before its premiere on 5th April 1803 at the Theater an der Wien. The evening’s opulent concert programme also included Beethoven's first two symphonies as well as his oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives. The composer himself played the piano part in the C minor Concerto and was much amused by his page-turner's confusion. Ignaz von Seyfried was mostly confronted with blank pages, except for a few scribbles that served as reference points for the performer. As usual, Beethoven hadn't taken the trouble to write out all of his part, which he played by heart. It is a fact that on the very morning of the concert, it was still jotting down a trombone part for the oratorio! Compared to Beethoven's first two piano concertos, the C minor Concerto shows clear evidence of progress in the instrumental balance, the soloist and the orchestra now being considered as equal partners. The virtuoso solo part is no longer solely indebted to the composer's ability to improvise but fully contributes to the work's dramatic and formal cohesion. The concerto's original manuscript was considered to be lost after the Second World War, but the valuable document resurfaced in Poland in 1977.
Shortly before celebrating his twentieth birthday, Schubert went through a depressive phase owing to the lack of opportunities he seemed to be then facing. Is this the reason that inspired him to call (at a later date) his Fourth Symphony the "Tragic Symphony"? The C minor key, which Schubert had never before used for an orchestra piece, is that of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 and the Coriolan Overture, which Schubert knew since 1809. An association with the idea of "destiny" and "heroic confrontation" led Schubert to choose the title of his symphony, which is in fact by no means tragic. The instrumentation, however, differs from Schubert's earlier symphonies: in his C minor Symphony, the composer has used four, rather than two horns, thus giving more weight to the orchestration that appears broader and more intensive than in past works. Schubert's 4th Symphony seems to justify its title in the first bars of the introduction by adopting a solemn and dark tone, but the initial tension soon vanishes in the Allegro vivace that follows. The Andante creates a typically intimate and lyrical Schubertian atmosphere that already foreshadows the great Schubert symphonies to come. The composer once again designated the robust scherzo that follows as a "Minuet". The final movement briefly returns to the dramatic opening mood before leading the piece to a flamboyant finish. This symphony might have been performed during Schubert's lifetime by a gathering of amateur musicians, but its public premiere did not take place until 1849.

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Good to know

Although Khatia Buniatishvili performed for the first time with orchestra at the age of six, she doesn't like to be considered as a child prodigy. The Georgian pianist is in fact not very interested in virtuosity as such: she prefers to refer to great pianists of the past such as Rachmaninoff, Richter or Gould. After studying at the Tbilisi Conservatory, Khatia Buniatishvili continued her training with Oleg Maisenberg in Vienna. Winner of the Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award (2010) and selected for the BBC New Generation Artists series, she was also named "Rising Star" by the Musikverein and Konzerthaus in Vienna for the 2011/12 season. Her international reputation is since then well established. This dazzling musician is invited to play with the world's best orchestras and enjoys partnerships with many leading conductors. She is also a dedicated chamber music performer and regularly plays with violinists Gidon Kremer and Renaud Capuçon or with her older sister Gvantsa, with whom she explores the piano duet repertoire.

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