Artists

Soloist

13 May '19

Extra Concert II
13 May '19

Anne-Sophie Mutter

Tour

Concert dates and locations

Artists

Programme

Our new concert series presents the best winners of the Migros Culture Percentage Student Award and the Encouragement Award. Discover the Soloists of Tomorrow in short 30-minutes recitals that will start one hour before the following concerts: 28.11.2018, 27.1.2019, 22.3.2019 and 13.5.2019 in Lucerne, 25.10.2018, 27.11.2018, 26.1.2019, 20.3.2019, 9.4.2019 and 26.5.2019 in Zurich. Your season ticket or concert ticket entitles to a free admission for each of these concerts.
Mozart was nineteen years old when he composed in quick succession his five violin concertos (1775) while holding a position as Kapellmeister at the court of the prince-archbishop of Salzburg. These five works remained Mozart's only concertos written for the violin. Although the composer preferred the piano as a solo instrument, the violin concertos reached a new peak in the progression of the genre after Johann Sebastian Bach's violin concertos. Mozart summarised in these works everything he had learned from recent musical development in Germany, France and Italy. In the course of his last Italian trip (autumn 1772 to March 1773), he had the opportunity of meeting great violin virtuosos emanating from Giuseppe Tartini's school. Mozart's concertos also speak volumes about the composer's own instrumental virtuosity. This was confirmed by his father, a famous teacher of great severity: "You yourself do not know how well you play the violin, if you will only do yourself credit and play with energy, with your whole heart and mind, yes, just as if you were the first violinist in Europe."
While the Concerto No. 2 KV 211 is still somewhat conventional, with the orchestra reduced to the role of a mere accompaniment, the violin and the orchestra engage in a much closer dialogue in the Concertos No. 3 KV 216 and No. 5 KV 219. The slow movements show great expressive depth, while the last movements show originality and have a few surprises in store for the listener.
Alongside these concertos, the orchestra will perform Mozart's Symphony No. 1 KV 16, the work of an eight-year-old. In 1764, the young musician was travelling with his family through Europe. He wrote this symphony in London, where he also encountered Johann Christian Bach. The influence of Bach's "London" son is clearly perceptible in Mozart's youth symphonies. This charming "first-born" fulfils a childish desire to make the violins dance and shows off the musician's pride at having composed his very first "Sinfonia". The piece was most probably premiered on February 21, 1765, at a concert that took place in London's Haymarket Theatre.
Mozart was nineteen years old when he composed in quick succession his five violin concertos (1775) while holding a position as Kapellmeister at the court of the prince-archbishop of Salzburg. These five works remained Mozart's only concertos written for the violin. Although the composer preferred the piano as a solo instrument, the violin concertos reached a new peak in the progression of the genre after Johann Sebastian Bach's violin concertos. Mozart summarised in these works everything he had learned from recent musical development in Germany, France and Italy. In the course of his last Italian trip (autumn 1772 to March 1773), he had the opportunity of meeting great violin virtuosos emanating from Giuseppe Tartini's school. Mozart's concertos also speak volumes about the composer's own instrumental virtuosity. This was confirmed by his father, a famous teacher of great severity: "You yourself do not know how well you play the violin, if you will only do yourself credit and play with energy, with your whole heart and mind, yes, just as if you were the first violinist in Europe."
While the Concerto No. 2 KV 211 is still somewhat conventional, with the orchestra reduced to the role of a mere accompaniment, the violin and the orchestra engage in a much closer dialogue in the Concertos No. 3 KV 216 and No. 5 KV 219. The slow movements show great expressive depth, while the last movements show originality and have a few surprises in store for the listener.
Alongside these concertos, the orchestra will perform Mozart's Symphony No. 1 KV 16, the work of an eight-year-old. In 1764, the young musician was travelling with his family through Europe. He wrote this symphony in London, where he also encountered Johann Christian Bach. The influence of Bach's "London" son is clearly perceptible in Mozart's youth symphonies. This charming "first-born" fulfils a childish desire to make the violins dance and shows off the musician's pride at having composed his very first "Sinfonia". The piece was most probably premiered on February 21, 1765, at a concert that took place in London's Haymarket Theatre.
Mozart was nineteen years old when he composed in quick succession his five violin concertos (1775) while holding a position as Kapellmeister at the court of the prince-archbishop of Salzburg. These five works remained Mozart's only concertos written for the violin. Although the composer preferred the piano as a solo instrument, the violin concertos reached a new peak in the progression of the genre after Johann Sebastian Bach's violin concertos. Mozart summarised in these works everything he had learned from recent musical development in Germany, France and Italy. In the course of his last Italian trip (autumn 1772 to March 1773), he had the opportunity of meeting great violin virtuosos emanating from Giuseppe Tartini's school. Mozart's concertos also speak volumes about the composer's own instrumental virtuosity. This was confirmed by his father, a famous teacher of great severity: "You yourself do not know how well you play the violin, if you will only do yourself credit and play with energy, with your whole heart and mind, yes, just as if you were the first violinist in Europe."
While the Concerto No. 2 KV 211 is still somewhat conventional, with the orchestra reduced to the role of a mere accompaniment, the violin and the orchestra engage in a much closer dialogue in the Concertos No. 3 KV 216 and No. 5 KV 219. The slow movements show great expressive depth, while the last movements show originality and have a few surprises in store for the listener.
Alongside these concertos, the orchestra will perform Mozart's Symphony No. 1 KV 16, the work of an eight-year-old. In 1764, the young musician was travelling with his family through Europe. He wrote this symphony in London, where he also encountered Johann Christian Bach. The influence of Bach's "London" son is clearly perceptible in Mozart's youth symphonies. This charming "first-born" fulfils a childish desire to make the violins dance and shows off the musician's pride at having composed his very first "Sinfonia". The piece was most probably premiered on February 21, 1765, at a concert that took place in London's Haymarket Theatre.
Mozart was nineteen years old when he composed in quick succession his five violin concertos (1775) while holding a position as Kapellmeister at the court of the prince-archbishop of Salzburg. These five works remained Mozart's only concertos written for the violin. Although the composer preferred the piano as a solo instrument, the violin concertos reached a new peak in the progression of the genre after Johann Sebastian Bach's violin concertos. Mozart summarised in these works everything he had learned from recent musical development in Germany, France and Italy. In the course of his last Italian trip (autumn 1772 to March 1773), he had the opportunity of meeting great violin virtuosos emanating from Giuseppe Tartini's school. Mozart's concertos also speak volumes about the composer's own instrumental virtuosity. This was confirmed by his father, a famous teacher of great severity: "You yourself do not know how well you play the violin, if you will only do yourself credit and play with energy, with your whole heart and mind, yes, just as if you were the first violinist in Europe."
While the Concerto No. 2 KV 211 is still somewhat conventional, with the orchestra reduced to the role of a mere accompaniment, the violin and the orchestra engage in a much closer dialogue in the Concertos No. 3 KV 216 and No. 5 KV 219. The slow movements show great expressive depth, while the last movements show originality and have a few surprises in store for the listener.
Alongside these concertos, the orchestra will perform Mozart's Symphony No. 1 KV 16, the work of an eight-year-old. In 1764, the young musician was travelling with his family through Europe. He wrote this symphony in London, where he also encountered Johann Christian Bach. The influence of Bach's "London" son is clearly perceptible in Mozart's youth symphonies. This charming "first-born" fulfils a childish desire to make the violins dance and shows off the musician's pride at having composed his very first "Sinfonia". The piece was most probably premiered on February 21, 1765, at a concert that took place in London's Haymarket Theatre.

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Good to know

Anne-Sophie Mutter is a musical phenomenon: for more than 40 years the virtuoso has now been a fixture in all the world’s major concert halls, making her mark on the classical music scene as a soloist, mentor and visionary. The four-time Grammy Award winner is equally committed to the performance of traditional composers as to the future of music: so far she has given world premieres of 26 works – Sebastian Currier, Henri Dutilleux, Sofia Gubaidulina, Witold Lutoslawski, Norbert Moret, Krzysztof Penderecki, Sir André Previn, Wolfgang Rihm and John Williams have all composed for Anne-Sophie Mutter. Furthermore, she dedicates herself to numerous benefit projects and to supporting tomorrow’s musical elite: in the autumn of 1997, she founded the “Association of Friends of the Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation e.V.”, to which the Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation was added in 2008. These two charitable institutions provide support for the scholarship recipients, support which is tailored to the fellows’ individual needs. Since 2011, Anne-Sophie Mutter has regularly shared the spotlight on stage with her ensemble of fellows, “Mutter’s Virtuosi”.

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