Artists

Orchestra

12 Nov '18

Concert II
12 Nov '18

I Barocchisti

Tour

Concert dates and locations

  • 12 November 2018 | Victoria Hall Geneva | 20:00

Artists

Programme

In the course of Vivaldi's lifetime, only thirteen volumes of his instrumental music were published. These include the Six Flute Concertos op. 10, commissioned and printed in Amsterdam in 1729 by the French publisher Michel-Charles Le Cène. Only one concerto of this set is an original work. The other pieces - including the two concertos that bear a title - are arrangements of earlier recorder concertos. Vivaldi did not only compose concertos for solo instruments. About sixty of his concertante works are intended for the orchestra alone, as is the case of the Concerto a quattro in C major included in the "Paris manuscript" kept at the Paris Conservatory library. This collection was probably intended for the French Embassy posted in Venice in the 1720s, to which Vivaldi might have addressed the final Chaconne written in a French style.
In the Holy Year 1725, flautist Johann Joachim Quantz went to Naples to meet Alessandro Scarlatti. The latter composed a few sonatas for the German virtuoso before dying a few months later, leaving behind him a generation of younger composers who quickly became established as the leading figures of a genuine "Neapolitan School". Domenico Sarro, a musician from Apuglia who composed many works for the Neapolitan theatres, was one of Scarlatti's successors. He was mainly known for his operas, but his production also includes a few instrumental works such as the Flute Concerto in A minor that appears in a collection of 24 concertos produced by different composers. Santino Cara reconstructed in 2009 this rarity in the flute repertoire on the base of the manuscript, which is kept in the library of the Conservatory S. Pietro a Majella in Naples.
Some twenty years younger than Vivaldi, Giovanni Battista Sammartini began his career composing vocal music before concentrating on instrumental works. The Milan-born musician was one of the most inventive symphonists of the pre-Classical period, whose fame extended to Austria, England and France. Throughout his sixty-odd symphonies, Sammartini delighted in experimenting with new solutions in the form of the genre, which was at that time not yet well defined. The Sinfonia in G major J-C 39 is made up of four movements. It is likely that the original Finale was later replaced by a Minuetto borrowed from a Trio sonata.
Baroque composer Arcangelo Corelli was a leading figure of the Italian violin school and also made a name for himself with his Concerti Grossi. The bulk of his production is gathered in six sets of twelve concertos each. The last of these volumes, composed in the 1680s but published posthumously in Amsterdam in 1714 (and once again the following year, by London editor John Walsh), includes twelve Concerti Grossi opposing solo instruments (concertino) to a larger orchestra group (ripieno). Unlike the other concertos of the op. 6, the Concerto in D major has only four movements.
Having studied with Corelli, Geminiani then developed his musical career outside of Italy. He spent most of his life in England but also travelled to Ireland, the Netherlands and Paris. Continuing in the footsteps of his teacher, Geminiani preferred to stick to the four-movement concerto structure, as opposed to the three-movement pattern of the new solo concertos. Geminiani boldly developed contrapuntal technique and harmonic originality. He has also arranged several Corelli sonatas, including the famous "Follia" for solo violin, which is based on a Portuguese dance.
In the course of Vivaldi's lifetime, only thirteen volumes of his instrumental music were published. These include the Six Flute Concertos op. 10, commissioned and printed in Amsterdam in 1729 by the French publisher Michel-Charles Le Cène. Only one concerto of this set is an original work. The other pieces - including the two concertos that bear a title - are arrangements of earlier recorder concertos. Vivaldi did not only compose concertos for solo instruments. About sixty of his concertante works are intended for the orchestra alone, as is the case of the Concerto a quattro in C major included in the "Paris manuscript" kept at the Paris Conservatory library. This collection was probably intended for the French Embassy posted in Venice in the 1720s, to which Vivaldi might have addressed the final Chaconne written in a French style.
In the course of Vivaldi's lifetime, only thirteen volumes of his instrumental music were published. These include the Six Flute Concertos op. 10, commissioned and printed in Amsterdam in 1729 by the French publisher Michel-Charles Le Cène. Only one concerto of this set is an original work. The other pieces - including the two concertos that bear a title - are arrangements of earlier recorder concertos. Vivaldi did not only compose concertos for solo instruments. About sixty of his concertante works are intended for the orchestra alone, as is the case of the Concerto a quattro in C major included in the "Paris manuscript" kept at the Paris Conservatory library. This collection was probably intended for the French Embassy posted in Venice in the 1720s, to which Vivaldi might have addressed the final Chaconne written in a French style.

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Good to know

In 1998 Diego Fasolis founded I Barocchisti, a Lugano-based ensemble that has won international acclaim as a leading exponent of period instrument performance. Its repertoire focuses on works from the 17th and 18th centuries written for formations ranging from 4 to 40 musicians. I Barocchisti regularly performs in major international venues with renowned soloists such as Philippe Jaroussky and Julia Lezhneve. Over the last years, I Barrochisti and Diego Fasolis have closely collaborated with Cecilia Bartoli, producing several recordings with the Italian mezzo-soprano. The album "Mission", devoted to the little-known Baroque composer Agostino Steffani, received a Grammy nomination. In 2015, I Barocchisti made their opera debut in Salzburg.

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