Artists

Orchestra

8 - 9 Apr '19

Tour V
8 - 9 Apr '19

Chamber Orchestra of Europe

Tour

Concert dates and locations

  • 08 April 2019 | Victoria Hall Geneva | 20:00
  • 09 April 2019 | Tonhalle Maag Zurich | 19:30

Artists

Programme Geneva

In December 1774, Mozart travelled to Munich for the premiere of his new opera "La Finta Giardiniera". The work was a great success, but the composer wasn't offered a new position, nor was he commissioned to write a new work. He was therefore forced to resume his job as court musician in Salzburg. It was on his return from Bavaria that Mozart composed in quick succession his five Violin concertos, between April and December 1775. Among other official duties at the Salzburg court, the young musician also had to play the violin, which was something he had learned very well under his father's tuition. It is possible that Mozart might have written these works for his personal use, but Antonio Brunetti, another court musician in Salzburg, undoubtedly also performed them. Before composing his violin concertos, Mozart's experience in the genre was limited to the little "intermediate" concertos he had placed within some of his Serenades. The Concerto Nº 3 in G major is surprising in many ways. While remaining faithful to the galant style, it presents a multitude of thematic ideas, especially in the final movement, a true "potpourri" in the French style that was then in vogue. With this concerto, Mozart produced an elaborate and highly personal work in which the orchestra accompaniment gained in importance.
Othmar Schoeck is one of the most outstanding Swiss composers of the first half of the 20th century, even though his postromantic style was considered as retrograde by the musical avant-garde of his time. Born in Brunnen (SZ), Schoeck studied in Zurich and Leipzig. The best of his production is to be found in the range of vocal music, especially his operas (including Venus and Penthesilea). His instrumental music is limited to a handful of orchestral and concertante works, as well a few chamber music compositions. The Bern Music Society commissioned the Pastoral Intermezzo "A Summer's Night" in 1945. This short symphonic poem for string orchestra was inspired by the eponymous poem (Sommernacht) written by the Zurich-born author Gottfried Keller (1819-1890). Schoeck himself indicated which images he selected in this poem telling of an old Alpine tradition to spark his musical inspiration. "On a starry summer's night, young country folk, moved by feelings of gratitude, harvest the ripened wheat in the fields of an orphan or widow who has no one to help with the work. The swishing of the scythes, the cries of joy, and the sound of the accordion betray the happy hustle and bustle of this old, beautiful tradition, until the crowing of the cock in the morning, the song of the awakening birds, and the early pealing of the bells call the valiant, secret helpers to their own heavy work."
"Boring, interminable and rambling": Viennese critics harshly sanctioned Beethoven's Third Symphony after its first public performance on 7 April 1805. The audience didn't show much enthusiasm either: "A Kreisler to put a stop to it!" shouted out a listener from the auditorium. It is a fact that no composer had yet had the audacity to write a symphony lasting almost an hour! "The "Eroica" will seem very short once a symphony outstretching an hour has been composed" was Beethoven's phlegmatic answer to all these attacks. Twelve years and five symphonies later, having only his "Ninth" to add to his symphonic cycle, Beethoven still gave his preference to his "Revolutionary" Symphony. It seems that is was General Bernadotte, future King of Sweden, who summoned Beethoven to write a symphony celebrating the glory of Bonaparte. The composer set to work in 1802 in Heiligenstadt. But at the end of 1804, Bonaparte was crowned emperor, much to Beethoven's disgust. The musician finally decided to dedicate his Third Symphony to Prince Lobkowitz. He then replaced the second movement - initially conceived as a triumphal march - with a funeral march. It was only in 1806 that the work finally got its full title printed on the first edition: "Heroic Symphony, Composed to celebrate the memory of a great man".

Programme Zurich

 

Our new concert series presents the best winners of the Migros Culture Percentage Student Award and the Encouragement Award. Discover the Soloists of Tomorrow in short 30-minutes recitals that will start one hour before the following concerts: 28.11.2018, 27.1.2019, 22.3.2019 and 13.5.2019 in Lucerne, 25.10.2018, 27.11.2018, 26.1.2019, 20.3.2019, 9.4.2019 and 26.5.2019 in Zurich. Your season ticket or concert ticket entitles to a free admission for each of these concerts.

Our Soloists of Tomorrow
In December 1774, Mozart travelled to Munich for the premiere of his new opera "La Finta Giardiniera". The work was a great success, but the composer wasn't offered a new position, nor was he commissioned to write a new work. He was therefore forced to resume his job as court musician in Salzburg. It was on his return from Bavaria that Mozart composed in quick succession his five Violin concertos, between April and December 1775. Among other official duties at the Salzburg court, the young musician also had to play the violin, which was something he had learned very well under his father's tuition. It is possible that Mozart might have written these works for his personal use, but Antonio Brunetti, another court musician in Salzburg, undoubtedly also performed them. Before composing his violin concertos, Mozart's experience in the genre was limited to the little "intermediate" concertos he had placed within some of his Serenades. The Concerto Nº 3 in G major is surprising in many ways. While remaining faithful to the galant style, it presents a multitude of thematic ideas, especially in the final movement, a true "potpourri" in the French style that was then in vogue. With this concerto, Mozart produced an elaborate and highly personal work in which the orchestra accompaniment gained in importance.
Othmar Schoeck is one of the most outstanding Swiss composers of the first half of the 20th century, even though his postromantic style was considered as retrograde by the musical avant-garde of his time. Born in Brunnen (SZ), Schoeck studied in Zurich and Leipzig. The best of his production is to be found in the range of vocal music, especially his operas (including Venus and Penthesilea). His instrumental music is limited to a handful of orchestral and concertante works, as well a few chamber music compositions. The Bern Music Society commissioned the Pastoral Intermezzo "A Summer's Night" in 1945. This short symphonic poem for string orchestra was inspired by the eponymous poem (Sommernacht) written by the Zurich-born author Gottfried Keller (1819-1890). Schoeck himself indicated which images he selected in this poem telling of an old Alpine tradition to spark his musical inspiration. "On a starry summer's night, young country folk, moved by feelings of gratitude, harvest the ripened wheat in the fields of an orphan or widow who has no one to help with the work. The swishing of the scythes, the cries of joy, and the sound of the accordion betray the happy hustle and bustle of this old, beautiful tradition, until the crowing of the cock in the morning, the song of the awakening birds, and the early pealing of the bells call the valiant, secret helpers to their own heavy work."
"Boring, interminable and rambling": Viennese critics harshly sanctioned Beethoven's Third Symphony after its first public performance on 7 April 1805. The audience didn't show much enthusiasm either: "A Kreisler to put a stop to it!" shouted out a listener from the auditorium. It is a fact that no composer had yet had the audacity to write a symphony lasting almost an hour! "The "Eroica" will seem very short once a symphony outstretching an hour has been composed" was Beethoven's phlegmatic answer to all these attacks. Twelve years and five symphonies later, having only his "Ninth" to add to his symphonic cycle, Beethoven still gave his preference to his "Revolutionary" Symphony. It seems that is was General Bernadotte, future King of Sweden, who summoned Beethoven to write a symphony celebrating the glory of Bonaparte. The composer set to work in 1802 in Heiligenstadt. But at the end of 1804, Bonaparte was crowned emperor, much to Beethoven's disgust. The musician finally decided to dedicate his Third Symphony to Prince Lobkowitz. He then replaced the second movement - initially conceived as a triumphal march - with a funeral march. It was only in 1806 that the work finally got its full title printed on the first edition: "Heroic Symphony, Composed to celebrate the memory of a great man".

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Good to know

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe (COE) was founded in 1981 by a group of young musicians graduating from the European Community Youth Orchestra whose ambition was to continue working together at the highest possible professional level. Of that original group, thirteen remain in the current core membership of around sixty musicians originating from all over Europe. The members of the COE, who are selected by the orchestra musicians, pursue parallel careers as international soloists, leaders and principals of renowned orchestras or as eminent chamber music players. The CEO regularly performs in Europe's major cities and occasionally in the USA and the Far East. The ensemble has strong links with the Lucerne Festival and many prestigious concert halls in Europe such as the Philharmonie de Paris, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and the Cologne Philharmonic. During its first years, the COE developed close relationships with the late Claudio Abbado and Nikolaus Harnoncourt. It is now fortunate to be working very closely with Bernard Haitink, Sir András Schiff and Yannick Nézet-Séguin. With the latter, the CEO has recorded several Mozart operas. These are a valuable addition to a rich discography of some 250 works for which the orchestra has won numerous international prizes. The CEO has also developed an active educational and outreach programme and runs since 2009 an academy that awards full scholarships to exceptionally talented postgraduate students.

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